Thursday, February 15, 2018

Catholic Reflections 654 : Homily First Sunday of Lent. B - Sunday, 18 February 2018

Homily First Sunday of Lent. B - Sunday, 18 February 2018
 
First Reading: Genesis 9:8-15
Psalm: Ps 24:4-9. “Your ways, O Lord, are love and truth to those who keep your covenant.”
Second Reading: 1 Peter 3:18-22
Gospel Acclamation: Matthew 4:4
Gospel: Mark 1:12-15
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Please listen to my audio recordings of the readings, prayers and reflections for the First Sunday of Lent. B - Sunday, 18 February 2018 by clicking this link here:   https://soundcloud.com/user-633212303/faith-hope-and-love-lent-1b  (EPISODE: 79 )
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“The Spirit drove Jesus out into the desert, and he remained in the desert for forty days, tempted by Satan. He was among wild beasts, and the angels ministered to him. After John had been arrested, Jesus came to Galilee proclaiming the gospel of God: ‘This is the time of fulfilment. The kingdom of God is at hand. Repent, and believe in the gospel’” (Mark 1:12-15).

“As Lent begins, the Church enters a period of spiritual renewal leading to Easter. Lent is a time of retreat.

We journey inward to places of solitude and silence to rediscover God’s love for us. To re-focus and re-connect to God’s priorities, and allow God to re-order our habits and choices according to God’s values.

In the passage prior to this Gospel for the first Sunday of Lent, Mark writes that Jesus was baptized in the River Jordan and heard the voice confirming that his future mission was blessed by his heavenly Father.

Then, we read that Jesus was driven into the wilderness by the Holy Spirit to prepare for his public mission.

The words are very powerful.  They are strong words:   Jesus was driven by the Holy Spirit into the wilderness. He was impelled, obliged, with a sense of urgency and necessity!

“He lived among wild beasts,”    - this makes me think of the fact that Jesus lived amongst the wild animals, and, at some time, we may all have heard the saying: “humans are just animals, so it’s only natural to respond to our base inclinations” But we might be surrounded by animals, it doesn’t mean we have to act like one. We humans have been given the rare gift of discernment; the ability to tell right from wrong. We have freedom and choice, so we are unique in being able to adapt our lives, our choices and our priorities so that we are not merely stuck in reacting only on instinct or inclinations, to any of life’s events.  We have been given the human grace (by God) to rise above might otherwise have us responding at the same level of response as animals.   Having said that, I do acknowledge that some commentators on human behaviour have rather ruefully observed that many animals can act better than the way some humans treat one another.

Temptation is real for humans and it appears it was something Jesus faced in his 40 days in the wilderness –
Our lives are filled with temptation, and Jesus’ life was also filled with temptation: The temptation to take an easier but not best path;   temptation to lost hope in difficult situations,  temptation to put ourselves and our needs  (legitimate or not) before others,  tempted to respond to our desires rather than our duties.  And so on.  In so many ways we are assailed by temptations to take a less loving, more selfish and less compassionate path. A path that denies that God is the centre of our lives and existence.

But “angels ministered to him” as he fasted and prayed during those forty days.

Do we accept the strength of the sacraments, the support of parishioners, family and friends, and the encouragement along the difficult path that is offered at different times? Hope is one of the best defences against the temptations that weigh us down. Hope need not be over-idealistic, but can exist even under the full weight of the reality of how bad things can be for many people.  Hope is never losing sight of God’s faithfulness and love, and hope is continuing to love and show the values of the gospel of Jesus even when everything around us may be going wrong.

For most of us, there is no physical desert. Our deserts are symbolic. They are moments of dryness in our lives that come from tensions in family life, arguments with significant others, anxiety about economic distress, world conflict, and many other sources.

This Gospel passage invites us to recognize those times when we experience our own “temptations” and “adversaries” of despair, desolation, and fear as times that reveal the face of God to us in an very close way. These are the times in which we discover our utter reliance on God. And this opens up the path to new and greater life.

Perhaps patience should be seen as one of the most powerful of the virtues… Forbearance, restraint, pause,  and “waiting in silence for God to save” are surely remedies to what would otherwise be a huge list of possible mistakes and dead-end pathways.

What have been “desert” moments in our lives that have caused us tension, stress, or despair? How has God been a part of these moments?  Can we let Jesus, who lived in the wilderness for forty days, (and who was assailed by the temptations that would later surface in other ways during his ministry and knowing that he faced suffering and eventually the cross,,,  because he was taking the path of love and forgiveness. Can we let Jesus lead us in this journey as we face so many different aspects of spiritual wilderness in our lives and allow His Spirit to fill us up with all the virtues that crowd-out sin…

That is:  Love, faith and hope, and also patience, goodness, and   chastity, temperance, charity, diligence, kindness, and humility.

Jesus is ably suited to leading and guiding us through this and all other experiences of wilderness.

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References:
Fr Paul W. Kelly

Word on the Go, a downloadable resource from RENEW International
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Archive of homilies and reflections is at: http://homilycatholic.blogspot.com.au
To contact Fr. Paul, please email: 
paulwkelly68@gmail.com

To listen to my weekly homily audio podcast, please click this link here. It is often a week or so Ahead: 
https://soundcloud.com/user-633212303/tracks

You are welcome to subscribe to Fr Paul’s homily mail-out by sending an email to this address:
paulkellyreflections+subscribe@googlegroups.com




First Sunday of Lent. B
(Sunday, 18 February 2018)

(EPISODE: 79 )

The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, and the love of God, and the communion of the Holy Spirit be with you all.
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Brothers and sisters, let us acknowledge our sins,
and so prepare ourselves to celebrate the sacred mysteries.
I confess to almighty God and to you, my brothers and sisters, that I have greatly sinned, in my thoughts and in my words, in what I have done and in what I have failed to do, through my fault, through my fault,* through my most grievous fault; therefore I ask blessed Mary ever-Virgin, all the Angels and Saints, and you, my brothers and sisters, to pray for me to the Lord our God.
May almighty God have mercy on us, forgive us our sins, and bring us to everlasting life.  Amen.
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Memorial Acclamation

We proclaim your Death, O Lord, and profess your Resurrection until you come again.

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Sunday Lent I

RECONCILIATION ii

Communion side.  pwk:  RH
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Go and announce the Gospel of the Lord.




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Monday, February 12, 2018

Catholic Reflections 653 : Ash Wednesday 14th February 2018

Ash Wednesday 14th February 2018
THE LITURGY OF THE WORD
First Reading: Joel 2:12-18
Psalm: Ps 50:3-6. 12-14. 17. “Lord make us turn to you; let us see your face and we shall be saved
Second Reading: 2 Corinthians 5:20 - 6:2
Gospel Acclamation: cf Ps 94:8
Gospel: Matthew 6:1-6. 16-18
Homily
Blessing and Distribution of Ashes
       Distribution of Ashes
       Song
Prayer of the Faithful
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Please listen to my audio recordings of the readings, prayers and reflections for the First Sunday Advent. Year B - Sunday, December 3, 2017 by clicking this link here:   https://soundcloud.com/user-633212303/faith-hope-and-love-ash-wednesday-2018   (EPISODE: 78 )
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Lent is described as a “joyful season”  ..  and so it is even as it also (at the same time)  a time of Prayer, penance and good works.  Which are three aspects of the one thing.
The age-old disciplines reflect our most fundamental concerns: our relationship with God (prayer), with our bodies (fasting) and with others (almsgiving). The purpose of fasting and abstinence is not to punish but to teach us a detachment from whatever may keep us from God. Turning our hearts more toward God and less toward food helps make us more disciplined and more charitable. In addition, the practice helps us imitate the example of Jesus who fasted for 40 days in preparation for his ministry and provides a means of expressing our common repentance. (From Elizabeth Harrington – Liturgy Brisbane)  © Liturgybrisbane.
Jesus was baptized the voice of his Heavenly Father said… “this is my son, my beloved….  I am well pleased with him… listen to him….”….   so, what did Jesus do next….    He didn’t revel in this wonderful compliment..  this profound affirmation….   Instead……….He felt impelled by the Holy Spirit to go into the wilderness for 40 days…..   
Precisely because the love and favour of God being “everything to Our Lord” ……    if he had that… then fame, fortune, possessions and influence meant nothing……..    and the wilderness… the desert reminded him of his total connection to his Father in heaven, and the need to get reject anything that was not of his Father …..   If people were to listen to him.. he must speak ONLY that which comes from his Father’s will …. His father’s word….. this needed a deep time of preparation and prayer…. And letting go of all but that which lasts…….
The thing about possessions is -  do we really own them?  or do they start owning us……    the more we can possess… the more we start to want….. the more we possess… the more we worry about protecting, guarding, fearing losing of things….. it becomes a real catch-twenty two…
Lent is a period of six weeks, which is a gift given to the church by God….  As a time of fostering positive habits of prayer, self-denial and giving in time or resources for worthy causes… to build up spiritual health…. and foster habits that are so natural that literally, our left-hand does not know what our right hand is doing.
“the only things that we actually keep are the things we give away…”…  in one sense that sounds like a nonsensical contradiction…  but God’s thinking is not like human’s so maybe there is something in it….   we only really know we own something, when we are free enough to let go of it…..    or perhaps it means something deeper…… the only things worth possessing are the things that only make sense when given….  they do nothing if stored… like love, given freely without expectation, kindness and forgiveness without expectation of return….    acts of charity not for recognition or approval…..      random acts of kindness that no one will ever know we are the perpetrators of…// There is an odd economic principle associated with love -- the more love you give away, the more love you have.  It defies all other economic principles.

The gospel has a lot of wisdom in it… those things are done for no other reason but the love of God and not for anything else…   call us to a deep inner movement of the heart towards God because it does not get any other reward but to serve and love God in each other… actions for the glory and praise of God alone…
so, let’s make this time of lent a wonderful, Joy-filled time of self-denial and making space for God… fostering positive habits for the year round….    and may God who has begun this good work in us, bring it to perfection… in the secret of our own hearts…



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References:
Fr Paul W. Kelly


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Archive of homilies and reflections:
http://homilycatholic.blogspot.com.au
To contact Fr. Paul, please email: 
paulwkelly68@gmail.com

To listen to my weekly homily audio podcast, please click this link here. It is often a week or so Ahead: 
https://soundcloud.com/user-633212303/tracks

You are welcome to subscribe to Fr Paul’s homily mail-out by sending an email to this address:
paulkellyreflections+subscribe@googlegroups.com 


Tuesday, February 06, 2018

Catholic Reflections 652 : Homily Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B - Sunday, 11 February 2018

Homily Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B - Sunday, 11 February 2018

THE LITURGY OF THE WORD
First Reading: Leviticus 13:1-2. 44-46
Psalm: Ps 31:1-2. 5. 11. “
I turn to you, lord, in time of trouble, and you fill me with the joy of salvation
Second Reading: 1 Corinthians 10:31 - 11:1
Gospel Acclamation: Luke 7:16
Gospel: Mark 1:40-45

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Please listen to my audio recordings of the readings, prayers and reflections for the Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B - Sunday, 11 February 2018 by clicking this link here:   https://soundcloud.com/user-633212303/6b-ordinary-faith-hope-and-love  (EPISODE: 77** )
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Here is a pre-Lenten message from Archbishop Mark Coleridge, Archbishop of Brisbane:

BEGINNING THE JOURNEY TO LENT: A WORD FROM ARCHBISHOP MARK

 

FOR THE SUNDAY BEFORE ASH WEDNESDAY

 

Greetings of peace to you all as we look towards Lent and to Easter that lies beyond.

Last December, the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse handed down its final report, as you knowLike the Australian Government and many other institutions, the Catholic bishops of Australia and leaders of religious institutes are currently studying the final report and its recommendations.


In the long years since the tragedy of child sexual abuse within the Catholic 
community became known, the Church has committed to policies, procedures and structures to respond better to survivors of abuse and their families, to establish professional standards for all ministers and Church workers, and to safeguard children and vulnerable people in every wayFor the Church, as for other institutions, this has involved gradual learning and development, and so it will continue to be.


Through these years, Australia’s bishops and other Church leaders have often expressed their sorrow and have offered their apology for what has occurred in the past – the harm suffered by victims, the instances of cover-up, the failure to believe survivors’ stories and to respond with compassion and justice, and the distress that many still experience. Our apologies have at times seemed too little – not because they were insincere but because trust has been broken. 
So we stand firm in our resolve to ensure that the abuse of children never happens again in the Catholic Church and to build new bonds of trust.


With the Royal Commission concluded, our country and our Church enter into a new moment. 
We are calling upon the Catholic community in Australia to embrace the new moment by beginning this penitential season of Lent with three days of fasting and reparation. Ash Wednesday, the Thursday following and the Friday following. So Wednesday, Thursday, Friday. Now, these are spiritual practices which express our desire for God’s reconciling and healing grace. Through fasting, we stand in solidarity with the victims of abuse whose much deeper hunger is for healing and peace in their lives. Through reparation, we make amends for the sin of those in the Church who abused children or failed to listen and act when they should have.  

 

The days of fasting and reparation in sorrow for child sexual abuse and for the healing of victims will be marked by prayer – in our homes and in our Catholic communities. The bishops have produced special resources for these days, and they have been distributed to the parishes for use far and wide; they will also be available on the Archdiocesan website. Please take to heart the importance of these days in preparing the whole Church to respond to the recommendations of the Royal Commission and to make the great journey from Ash Wednesday to Easter. We cant undo the past. But we can, with God’s help, make the future better.

 

Archbishop Mark Coleridge
(Archbishop of Brisbane) 

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Homily from
Fr Paul

The Gospel today is a wonderful example of God's great desire to reach out and touch us…… to include and heal us.

There is sadly much illness and suffering in the world. We pray that those who are sick, will be healed of their illness and brought out of their suffering…..and in every case may the Lord touch their lives with peace, and strength and assure them that God is with them in this difficult journey….
 
Today’s Gospel makes it really clear that God loves us completely and desires that we be healed, freed from the burden of suffering and reunited with our community……
 
Jesus is the compassion of God…. And Jesus shows us the endless depths of that compassion and love for us….
 
God loves us so much that Jesus reaches out and touches us… Because Jesus is God the son, he could simply have said to the leper, 'you are healed' and he would have been…. But the poor man was suffering illness,…. He was isolated from his community….. he was alone…. And Jesus reaches out and touches him to bring him back into the community… and heal his Spirit too……..
 
According to Jewish law, those who are considered unclean… such as this leper had to stay away…. It must have been torture to not only be sick but to also be a thing of horror and revulsion that everyone keeps away from………… anyone who is touched by someone unclean (according to the Jewish law of Jesus' time) is regarded by the law to also be unclean… even if they don't show the signs of the illness…. They are an outcast from the society for a given time until it is clear that they have not shown any signs of the disease….. Jesus by touching him shows that when there is illness or suffering. God does not just have a deep concern for the people involved but that God is right there in the midst of it…. Touching those hurt… and taking on their pain, their illness their suffering… sharing it and working to heal it…. Jesus is not just in the midst of suffering… jesus is in the people who suffer and in the people who reach out to help…… God's concern, love and involvement is that deep…. That complete….
 
The Gospel also shows us that Jesus respected the religious law of his time… He respected the Law of Moses….. and did not come to abolish the law of Moses but rather to complete it, to perfect it…… So, when the man is cured… and he is cured instantly, Jesus could have said… you are cured, so go on your way…. But no, he asks the man to fulfil the law about having his illness officially declared cured…….
 
"All of us pray to be free of illness and free of sin. Just as leprosy was and is contagious, so also sin can be contagious in its own way.
 
We often forget that sin can be, in some sense, contagious. When we read the newspapers or watch television for a few days, almost always there are articles in the newspapers or presentations on the television that seek to change our minds and our hearts to accept the values of this world – many of which are inconsistent with Christ’s Way. This is how sin and opposing values are spread: engaging with and being open to those beliefs has been compromised by the values of this world.  We are not called to withdraw from the world and form a disconnected society, but as always, we are invited to follow the Lord Jesus and to live closely connected to him by His word and his sacraments. The values given to us in the Holy Scriptures keep us on track. Jesus is a healer, one who constantly is bringing good health to others, both physically and spiritually. We are called to pray for the physical health of one another as well as the spiritual health."
(quote from Abbot's Homily. Monastery Christ in the Desert).

Jesus is right there in the midst of his people and reaching out and touching those most isolated, most rejects and most in need.  He could have healed the leper just by speaking (he did that in the past), but in order to show compassion and love and to re-connect the leper to the community and show the true meaning of God’s law, he reached out and risked being declared unclean in order to save and heal that man.  (As I mentioned, Our Lord could theoretically have just waved his hands and cured everyone everywhere in the world,  but the healing itself was not merely “of or for itself”...   It was out of compassion. It was a moving encounter with God, whose essential nature is loving and compassionate and deeply involved in our lives and who offers us more than healing, but a place in God's family forever.  Those he cured would eventually get sick again and eventually all reach the end of their lives...  but he was offering them a peace and a membership of God's family that will stay with them in this life and the next, and that needs a life-changing encounter with Christ and his gospel.

Jesus also shows us God’s attitude towards our suffering when Jesus declares “of course I want to heal you!”

God’s compassion and love for others is the key to everything Jesus says and does. Jesus put people first and at the same time put his heavenly Father first, because the love of God, love of neighbour and love and care of oneself are different aspects of the same one teaching.

St Paul in the second reading..  sums up what it’s all about in our ministries and service… “Whatever you do at all, do it for the glory of God. ……try to be helpful to everyone at all times, not anxious for my own advantage but for the advantage of everybody else, so that they may be saved.” And that is at the heart of what we do…   everything for the honour and glory of God….

 
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References:
Fr Paul W. Kelly

Abbot's Homilies - Benedictine Abbey of Christ in the Desert.. (2009) [online] Benedictine Abbey of Christ in the Desert. Available at: https://christdesert.org/updates/abbots-homilies/

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Archive of homilies and reflections is at: http://homilycatholic.blogspot.com.au
To contact Fr. Paul, please email: 
paulwkelly68@gmail.com

To listen to my weekly homily audio podcast, please click this link here. It is often a week or so Ahead: 
https://soundcloud.com/user-633212303/tracks

You are welcome to subscribe to Fr Paul’s homily mail-out by sending an email to this address:
paulkellyreflections+subscribe@googlegroups.com

Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B
(
Sunday, 11 February 2018)

(EPISODE: 77** )

The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, and the love of God, and the communion of the Holy Spirit be with you all.
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Brothers and sisters, let us acknowledge our sins,
and so prepare ourselves to celebrate the sacred mysteries.
You raise the dead to life in the Spirit. Lord, have mercy//You bring pardon and peace to the sinner. Christ, have mercy// You bring light to those in darkness. Lord, have mercy//
May almighty God have mercy on us, forgive us our sins, and bring us to everlasting life.  Amen.

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Memorial Acclamation

We proclaim your Death, O Lord, and profess your Resurrection until you come again.

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Sundays Ordinary V

Euch prayer two

Communion side.  pwk: 
LH
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Go in peace, glorifying the Lord by your life.



 
 
(**episode numbers have been adjusted due to a new, revised, counting system).  



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Tuesday, January 30, 2018

Catholic Reflections 651 : Homily Fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B - Sunday, 4 February 2018

Homily Fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B - Sunday, 4 February 2018
[-RH-]
Job 7:1-4, 6-7 Job considers the human experience and finds it tedious, difficult, and miserable.
Psalm 147:1-2, 3-4, 5-6 Praise the Lord who cares for the multitude of stars and all of us with wisdom and love. “Praise the Lord, who heals the broken-hearted”
1 Corinthians 9:16-19, 22-23 Saint Paul admits that preaching is tough, but withholding the gospel is not an option.
Mark 1:29-39 Jesus declares his purpose: to proclaim the good news to one and all.
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Please listen to my audio recordings of the readings, prayers and reflections for the Fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B - Sunday, 4 February 2018 by clicking this link: https://soundcloud.com/user-633212303/5b-faith-hope-and-love  (EPISODE: 73 )
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The readings this weekend give a wonderful insight into the core motivation for both Jesus’ ministry and also his apostle, the great Saint Paul. (Scripture scholar William Barclay has some excellent insights into this……: (The Daily Study Bible. Gospel of Mark. (Revised Edition).” By William Barclay)

“In the first reading, Paul rather concisely sums up his vision of what he is doing.
His ministry is a privilege given to him by his personal encounter with the risen Lord, and yet it is also his duty. He “had not chosen the work; it had chosen him; he could no more stop doing it than he could stop breathing; and there could, therefore, be no question of payment… His task was not so much a job but a vocation. The motivation of this vocation is not accumulation of wealth or other personal comforts, but for the satisfaction of being a servant of Christ in his mission. 
 
It is like the story of a professor at a university who in his retirement speech announced that he would have done his job for free because he was so committed to the work and so passionate about it. I am sure his employers would have liked to hear this revelation some time prior to his very last day of work though!
 
For St Paul, there was nevertheless great reward. He had the satisfaction of bringing the gospel freely to all people who would receive it. The real reward of any task is the satisfaction of a job well done.

Albert Schweitzer (the great philosopher and medical missionary) describes the kind of moment which brought him the greatest happiness. Someone suffering intensely is brought into his hospital. He soothes the man by telling him that he will anaesthetize him and will operate on him and all will be well. After the operation he sits beside the patient waiting for him to regain consciousness. Slowly he opens his eyes and then whispers in sheer wonderment, "I have no more pain." That was it. There was no material reward there, but a satisfaction as deep as the depths of the heart itself.

To have mended one shattered life, to have restored one wanderer to the right way, to have healed one broken heart, to have brought one soul to Christ is not a thing whose reward can be measured in monetary terms, - its joy is beyond all measurement.

Saint Paul uses the now famous saying that he has “become all things to all people.” This explains his method of ministry. It is often misunderstood. He does not mean, by this phrase, that he tries to be (hypocritically) one thing to one person and quite a different or contradictory thing to another. It means having the ability to “get alongside anyone.” The person “who can never see anything but their own point of view and who never makes any attempt to understand the mind and heart of others, will never make a a particularly good friend let alone a disciple of Christ.

We can never attain to any kind of evangelism or friendship without speaking the same language and understanding the same thoughts as the other person.

Now we move from the disciple to the Master, Jesus. His actions in today’s gospel are (as usual) truly inspiring and revealing.


In the synagogue Jesus had spoken and acted in the most amazing way. The synagogue service ended and Jesus went with his friends to Peter's house. According to Jewish custom the main Sabbath meal came immediately after the synagogue service, at the sixth hour, that is at 12 o'clock midday. (The Jewish day began at 6 a.m. and the hours are counted from then.) Jesus might well have claimed the right to rest after the excitement and exhaustion of the synagogue service; but once again his compassion was appealed to and once again he spent himself for others. This miracle tells us something about three people.


It tells us something about Jesus. He did not require an audience in order to exert his power; There were many “healers” and exorcists in the time of Jesus, but they worked with elaborate incantations, and spells, and magical props. In contrast, in the synagogue Jesus had only spoken one authoritative sentence and the healing was complete.

Here we have the same thing again. Peter's mother-in-law was suffering from "a burning fever." … Jesus completely disregarded the standard props commonly used by magicians to treat such an illness, -- and with a gesture and a word of unique authority and power, he healed the woman.

……A miracle to Jesus was not a means of increasing his prestige; to help was not a laborious and disagreeable duty; he helped instinctively, because he was supremely interested in all who needed his help.{Jesus isn’t a hired worker… he is a friend and companion along the journey…. It isn’t his occupation to heal… he does it out of compassion and love…….}

We learn something too about Peter's wife's mother. No sooner was she healed than she began to attend to their needs. She used her recovered health for renewed service. Hence the rather beautiful motto: "Saved to Serve." Jesus helps us that we may help others.

The crowds soon heard of Jesus’ wondrous healing……crowds were eager to seek him out… but it was Sabbath….. they must wait until Saturday evening when Sabbath concluded…. Because it was against the law to carry even a sick person on a stretcher during Sabbath, as that was regarded as work. They had, of course, no clocks or watches in those days; the Sabbath ran from 6 p.m. to 6 p.m.; and the law was that the Sabbath was ended and the day had finished when three stars came out in the sky. So the people of Capernaum waited until the sun had set and the stars were out and then they came, carrying their sick, to Jesus; and he healed them.


The people flocked to Jesus because they recognized in him a man who could do things. …. The crowds came because they wanted something out of Jesus. They did not necessarily come because they loved him; they did not probably come because they had caught a glimpse of some new vision; in the last analysis they wanted to use him. That is what many people wants to do with God and his Son. For one prayer that goes up to God in days of prosperity ten thousand go up in time of adversity.
Someone has said that many people regard religion as belonging "to the ambulance corps and not to the firing-line of life." ……... We must all go to Jesus; for he alone can give us the things we need for life; but if that going and these gifts do not produce in us an answering love and gratitude there is something tragically wrong. God is not someone to be used in the day of misfortune; he is someone to be loved //

Finally we learn something about Jesus as man of prayer….Jesus was left with no time alone. Now Jesus knew all too well that he could not abide without significant connection to his Heavenly Father. If he was going to be forever giving out, he must be at least sometimes taking in; He knew that he could not live without prayer. It was essential and important to him. It was integral to him.


We see today, that Jesus never separated words and actions. He never separated soul and body. The Christian message is one and it preaches and works for the good of a person's body as well as the good of their soul.

Jesus never separated earth and heaven. There are those who are so concerned with heaven that they forget all about earth and so become impractical visionaries. There are those who are so concerned with earth that they forget about heaven and limit good to this earth’s material good. The dream of Jesus was a time when God's will would be done in earth as it is in heaven, (Matt.6:10) then earth and heaven will be united.”*
 
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References:

*THE DAILY STUDY BIBLE. GOSPEL OF MARK. (REVISED EDITION). BY WILLIAM BARCLAY.

Fr Paul W. Kelly

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Archive of homilies and reflections: http://homilycatholic.blogspot.com.au
To contact Fr. Paul, please email: paulwkelly68@gmail.com

To listen to my weekly homily audio podcast, please click this link here. It is often a week or so Ahead: https://soundcloud.com/user-633212303/tracks

You are welcome to subscribe to Fr Paul’s homily mail-out by sending an email to this address: paulkellyreflections+subscribe@googlegroups.com


Fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B

(Sunday, 4 February 2018)
(EPISODE: 73 )

Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. (or/ The Lord be with You)
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Brothers and sisters, let us acknowledge our sins,
and so prepare ourselves to celebrate the sacred mysteries.
Lord Jesus, you are the image of the unseen God: Lord, have mercy.//You are the firstborn of all creation: Christ, have mercy//You are the head of the body, the Church: Lord, have mercy//
May almighty God have mercy on us, forgive us our sins, and bring us to everlasting life. Amen.
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Memorial Acclamation
Save us, Saviour of the world, for by your Cross and Resurrection you have set us free.

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Sundays Ordinary IV

Eucharistic Prayer One

Communion side. pwk:  RH
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Go and announce the Gospel of the Lord.



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